Fresh Water

Approximately 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water. However, fresh water accounts for just 3% of this figure. The majority is out of reach in frozen glaciers or inaccessible deep underground.

In the lush green lands of Britain, and much of Europe, rivers, streams, lakes and ponds are plentiful. These incredibly important ecosystems cover less than 0.01% of the planet’s total surface area but support a staggering number of species. Vibrant kingfishers nest in our riverbanks, invertebrates burrow into muddy lake and river basins and an astonishing variety of birds, amphibians and mammals rely on freshwater vegetation for food and shelter

Freshwater habitats are now one of the most at risk ecosystems in the world, thanks to human development, pollution and climate change. However there are many initiatives working to reduce water pollution and restore natural freshwater habitats. Works such as reinstating river meanders, leaving natural debris in the water, and providing alternative routes around barriers for migrating fish are having wide-reaching positive effects.

Read more

Approximately 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water. However, fresh water accounts for just 3% of this figure. The majority is out of reach in frozen glaciers or inaccessible deep underground.

In the lush green lands of Britain, and much of Europe, rivers, streams, lakes and ponds are plentiful. These incredibly important ecosystems cover less than 0.01% of the planet’s total surface area but support a staggering number of species. Vibrant kingfishers nest in our riverbanks, invertebrates burrow into muddy lake and river basins and an astonishing variety of birds, amphibians and mammals rely on freshwater vegetation for food and shelter

Freshwater habitats are now one of the most at risk ecosystems in the world, thanks to human development, pollution and climate change. However there are many initiatives working to reduce water pollution and restore natural freshwater habitats. Works such as reinstating river meanders, leaving natural debris in the water, and providing alternative routes around barriers for migrating fish are having wide-reaching positive effects.

End of gallery

No more pages to load