Forth Bridges, Firth of Forth, Scotland

Published: 9th October 2017 at 12:14 pm. Posted in Blog.

The Forth Road and Rail bridges during the blue hour, I was really lucky to get a calm evening for some nice reflections! - Forth Bridges, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

As part of my award in Landscape Photographer of the Year, I was treated to an exclusive all access visit to the Forth Rail Bridge. As it was a fair journey up to here from my home in Sheffield, I decided to extend the trip and visit some additional locations with my partner.

On the way up we made a stop at Beadnell with the plan to visit the Farne Islands and some of the surrounding coastline. Unfortunately we were hit by a summer storm and the visit to the Farne Islands had to be cancelled as the boats couldn’t land. Sadly The rain and high winds continued from here throughout my journey up to Scotland and so I still hadn’t managed any photography.

Thankfully on the day I visited the Forth bridge the wind and rain finally died down and I was able to enjoy the day! 

Francis Taylor and Charlie Waite at the Forth Bridge, Scotland

My partner and I met up with Charlie, Diana and Scott at Queensferry train station and we headed down together to the bridge. Here we met with some of the engineers and after donning some very fashionable hard hats, we headed up to the top in the Engineers lift.

Francis Taylor and Charlie Waite on top of the Forth Bridge

At the top there was a big platform offering some stunning views over the Firth of Forth and I had a great time creating some compositions.

Leading lines of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards South Queensferry, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

Leading lines of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards South Queensferry.

View from the top of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards North Queensferry, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

View from the top of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards North Queensferry.

A boat in the harbour taken from the top of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards North Queensferry, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

A boat in the North Queensferry Harbour.

View down to the railway tracks from the top of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards North Queensferry, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

View down to the railway tracks from the top of the Forth Rail Bridge, looking towards North Queensferry, Firth of Forth, Scotland. 

After spending some time on the top, we headed back down and across to South Queensferry and walked underneath the bridge to the first platform. Here we had the opportunity to look right onto the tracks and watch the trains as they rattled along the tracks.

Finally we headed back along and said our goodbyes to the group at the station after what was truly memorable day!

After my visit to the top during the day, we headed into Edinburgh to capture some night scenes from Calton Hill, a great viewpoiunt in the centre of the city.

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Princess Street from Calton Hill at Dusk.

After spending a couple of hours on Calton Hill we headed back to South Queensferry and photographed the forth road and rail bridges from the ground during the blue hour, I was really lucky to get a calm evening for some nice reflections!

The Forth Road and Rail bridges during the blue hour, I was really lucky to get a calm evening for some nice reflections! - Forth Bridges, Firth of Forth, Scotland.

The Forth Road and Rail bridges during the blue hour, I was really lucky to get a calm evening for some nice reflections!

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The Forth Rail Bridge from the rocky bay, you can see the ongoing construction of the newest bridge in the background.

After my time in Queensferry it was time to head back down to Sheffield and as we had finally got some lovely warm weather, we decided to stop by the lovely St Abbs for a day on the coast. 

Long exposure of St Abbs Head, shwoing the colour of the beautiful turquoise water.

Long exposure at St Abbs Head, showing the colour of the beautiful turquoise water.

I hope you enjoyed reading a little bit about my trip, I’ve included some additional information about the Forth Bridges below:

About the Forth Bridges

Scotland’s three Forth Bridges stand side by side spanning the Firth of Forth, each bridge is unique, representing the best in engineering and design over the centuries.

Completed in early 1890, the iconic Cantilever design of the Forth Rail Bridge is recognised throughout the world as the first major steel structure. The bridge still holds the world record for the world’s longest cantilever bridge and represents a key point in the history of the modern railway. After the years had begun to take their toll on the structure, a full-scale restoration project to return the bridge to its original construction condition was completed in 2012. In July 2015, UNESCO inscribed the Forth Bridge as the sixth World Heritage site in Scotland.

The Forth Road Bridge is an impressive suspension bridge that spans the Forth 1006m between the two towers. Upon completion the bridge was the fourth longest in the world. From end to end the bridge is over 2.5 km long, constructed from an incredible 39,000 tonnes of steel and 125,000 cubic metres of concrete.

The final bridge, the Queensferry Crossing, is the longest three-tower, cable-stayed bridge in the world, spanning an incredible 1.7 miles. The innovative design of the cross spanning cables provides the extra strength and support which allows the towers and the deck to be more slender and elegant.

You can find more about the Forth Bridges here.